Pacific holds human trafficking education event

Pacific holds human trafficking education event

FBI

FBI

According to a Gallup poll, 35.8 million people work in some form of slavery around the world.
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports that America isn’t exempt from this practice, with 14,500 to 17,000 people being imported into U.S. labor and sex trades each year; 50 percent of those imported are children.
Of those thousands, a little under 50 percent were solicited into prostitution, with the second leading industry being forms of domestic servitude.
On April 15, Michelle Lacondeguy ’17 used her experience to educate and inform on anti-human trafficking efforts.
Lacondeguy interns for the International Rescue Committee, which addresses state refugee and human trafficking concerns from its Sacramento headquarters.
The four biggest trafficking states include our very own state of California, with Nevada, New York and Texas also qualifying.
In California, organizations like the International Rescue Committee have created resources for the more than 1,000 reported people trafficked into the state each year.
Michelle hopes to focus on the Central Valley and Sacramento areas as she furthers her research. “The biggest part of creating this presentation is not getting lost in the sheer size of international statistics,” Lacondeguy says, “I’ve taken to awareness and informing others on how they can do something about human trafficking.
I educate to inspire others to research and use my teaching to be aware of signs related to human trafficking.”
Michelle works alongside University of the Pacific’s Student-to-Student Healthy Relationships Peer Educators. Educators engage with fellow students on everything from bystander intervention, inclusive language, healthy self-image and recognizing types of abuse, as well as sex education and awareness.
Through monthly meetings, the team receives instruction on providing support services to students on issues relating to the creation and development of healthy relationships. The S2S Educators then use the resources at the Multicultural Center and offer presentations throughout the year.
While Lacondeguy’s anti-human trafficking presentation was offered on April 15, organizations often request other discussions and presentations to be given at their gatherings.
S2S is a paid service, with listings for job openings on Tiger Jobs through insidePacific. If you would like to speak on healthy relationships, consider applying for next term.

About Jeremy Gottschalk

Editor-in-Chief of The Pacifican 2016-17.

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Jeremy Gottschalk

Editor-in-Chief of The Pacifican 2016-17.
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