Submit to Calliope, Pacific’s lit mag, by March 1!

Submit to Calliope, Pacific’s lit mag, by March 1!

Hi there, Tigers! Do you have an interest in penning poetry, short fiction, nonfiction or short essays? Do you sketch, paint, sculpt or otherwise create art? Perhaps you have a piece or two you’ve been sitting on, looking for somewhere worthy to submit, or perhaps you have a few promising works that just need a bit of polishing up.
Whatever the case, Pacific’s award-winning literary and arts magazine, Calliope, is waiting on tenterhooks to accept your submissions created from the spring 2014 semester onward.
For the uninitiated, a quick rundown: Calliope Literary and Arts Magazine has a rich and esteemed history, springing from two previous Pacific publications, The Pharos (1893-1912) and The Hieroglyph (1931-33).
Between the ‘70s and 2000, Calliope underwent a variety of transformations until it reached its current iteration of accepting Pacific students’ original literary and art works, carefully selected by a student staff for publication.
But what’s in a name? As those familiar with Greek mythology may have already surmised, the magazine’s title, too, stems from an epic history.
Calliope is so named after the oldest Greek muse, said to embody eloquence and epic poetry; often heralded as Homer’s muse in the Odyssey and the Iliad, Calliope is also called on by the Roman poet Virgil in the Aeneid.
Every edition of the magazine — save for the first, which featured artwork by renowned Art Nouveau painter Alphonse Mucha — features a student artist’s interpretation of Calliope.
Perhaps invocations do hold power, because between 2009-2013, Calliope accrued five national commendations from the prestigious APEX Awards for Publishing Excellence. The current student editorial and design teams hope to continue this trend in the future, and with promising submissions already, this latest issue has potential.
Of course, Calliope’s student boards do not deserve all the credit — Dr. Courtney Lehmann of the Department of English advises the literary editorial board, while Professor Bret DeBoer of the Department of Visual Arts oversees the art side.
The University’s Humanities Center, as well as generous donations from both local businesses and individuals, provides the financial support necessary for Calliope to come to fruition.
Overall, the publication process is a painstaking, love-laced collaboration within the Pacific community, involving works from students from a variety of majors and backgrounds.
Calliope ultimately aims to reflect the compassion and diversity of Pacific’s student body and, perhaps even more aspirationally, to capture the zeitgeist of each year.
So what are you waiting for? Dust off your thinking cap, channel that latent creativity and create something you’re proud of.
For consideration for the upcoming issue, direct your submissions (and any questions) to uopcalliope@gmail.com by March 1.
The student literary and art teams await your works with bated breath.

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