It’s just coffee: time to get over the red cup ruckus

It’s just coffee: time to get over the red cup ruckus

Starbucks rang in the holiday season with noticeably graphic-less ombré red cups this year, causing an uproar from consumers.
As usual, Facebook fueled the spread of the wildfire. Joshua Feuerstein, a so-called social media evangelist, posted a video to his popular page. In his monologue, Feuerstein made claims that Starbucks purposefully removed “Christmas” and “Merry Christmas” from their cups, essentially removing Christ from their seasonal cups.
Feuerstein even went as far as to say that Starbucks does not allow its employees to say “Merry Christmas” to customers. As a current employee, I can testify that his allegations are false.
CNBC reported that Starbucks was mentioned over 474,000 times, and “red cup” has been mentioned more than 61,000 times on social media in the past week. This in turn sparked the hashtag #itsjustacup, which only reached over 4,400 mentions.
It’s interesting to note that Pacific’s on-campus Calaveras Coffee House does not serve the contentious red cups, because they are a licensed store and not corporate. Calaveras has some of the holiday beverages, but none of the cheer… or controversy.
Of course, one should take into consideration that past red cups featured snowflakes and snowmen. These do symbolize the holiday season, but not Christmas specifically — especially not what Christmas is meant to evoke for Christians.
All in all, it’s clear that one misleading Facebook video gave misinformed people something to raise a ruckus over. Ultimately, the red cup is just a disposable paper receptacle for overpriced coffee. Its color is merely meant to ring in the holiday festivities.
Finals season is upon us, Tigers, and while we will be consuming plenty of coffee, I trust we’ll be far more concerned with what is in the cup and not what is (or is not) on the outside.

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Cecilia Tribuzio

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