Police boycott won’t affect Tarantino’s popularity

Police boycott won’t affect Tarantino’s popularity

The issue of police brutality has been a hot topic in the past year, with big names attaching themselves to the issue. Quentin Tarantino and the Director of the FBI, James Comey, have been pushing the buttons of police officers and critics alike recently.
The Los Angeles Times reported Quentin Tarantino’s involvement in New York City’s rally against police brutality in the last week of October. Tarantino referred to police officers as “murderers” when he spoke at the rally.
This specific dialogue used by the famous film director triggered a boycott against his films by the NYPD, shortly followed by a boycott from the LAPD. Los Angeles Police Protective League President Craig Lally said that Tarantino’s “rhetoric” paints a bigger target on police officers’ backs than there already was.
Tarantino retorted that he is “a human being with a conscience” who will speak his mind on what he thinks is right or wrong. Of course, the real question is whether or not the boycott will have an impact on the Christmas Day release of Tarantino’s latest film, “The Hateful Eight.”
As a Tarantino fan, I would say that it won’t have a drastic enough impact on the earnings of the film. Tarantino films already draw a specific audience. There is also plenty of time between now and the film premiere for the boycott and issue with Tarantino’s words to blow over.
Tarantino is ultimately popular amongst college students, which means that the boycott happening now will most likely not affect their attendance to his latest film. Based on my experience, I believe it also won’t stop them from rewatching any of his other films.
A director in a different sense, James Comey has also been stirring the pot with critics. The Boston Globe reported that Comey has been calling into question the effect of YouTube and circulating cellphone videos on an officer’s will to act in any given situation. He then fueled the fire by stating that “an outbreak of constitutionally protected community scrutiny” has accelerated a crime wave.
Both Tarantino and Comey’s involvement and responses to the issue of police brutality in America show that everyone’s nerves are fraying. More people are becoming involved and the issue is not resolving itself.
We can only hope that the increasing involvement, no matter in what way, will shed more light on the situation and lead to greater results for the public.

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Cecilia Tribuzio

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