Studying for your impending doom midterms

Studying for your impending doom midterms

It’s that time of year again: Midterms. I know, time went by so quickly — yesterday we were at the beach, not a care in the world, and now? We’re slaving away in the library, trying to study and motivate ourselves.
Of course, it seems this struggle is a universal one, according to word of mouth and Yik Yak. Worry not! Here are some study tips to get you through this semester.
1. Choose a study place. College students like studying in places they feel comfortable in, like on their bed, sofa or the like. However, studying somewhere you are used to doing something else, like sleeping on the bed, or relaxing and reading a book on the sofa, will distract you.
If you are studying for microbiology on your bed, you may begin to feel sleepy, since your bed’s primary purpose is for sleep. Choose somewhere you know you will sit up straight and without distractions, like a room in the library or a quiet bench in a park.
2. Form a study group. A study group will lessen your load! Divide those seven chapters of financial accounting between seven friends, and you’ll be prepared for that exam in no time.
It’s easier when you’re with your friends because you can have the illusion of having fun, but actually be studying! Making intellectual jokes that only you seven get is a plus, too.
3. Take breaks. Breaks can help you stay focused and happy. Most college students now study by staring at a bright screen. They also tend to read things they haven’t been exposed to before, aren’t interested in or have just been slacking off for the last few weeks.
Taking a short break from that material can leave you feeling refreshed and energetic, enthusiastic to get back on the grind. Go for a walk, buy some ice cream and eat it or just stretch in your dorm room! Just make sure you are getting sufficient break time for all the studying you’re doing.
4. Eat well. This is the second most important thing you can do while you are studying for multiple exams at the same time (unless you’re an English major, in which case you might be writing multiple papers at the same time). There are many foods you can eat to stimulate your brain like acai berries, oatmeal, avocados, walnuts and blueberries (just to name a few).
Besides being tasty, nourishing choices, brain foods tend to help protect against free radical damage to cells in the brain. Free radical damage can lead to forms of dementia or other degenerative diseases.
5. Exercise. I cannot stress (pun intended) enough how important this is for college students who are juggling so many things at once.
Not only does exercise release the tension in your muscles from sitting in one position for long periods of time, it also energizes you! Exercise releases endorphins, which pump you up. This is why you feel extremely energetic after a particularly hard workout.
Well Tigers, I sincerely hope this helped you evaluate your choices and study better! It’s a long and harsh road ahead, but I believe in every single one of you. Good luck on midterms!

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