One year of sabbatical

One year of sabbatical

Sasha Kasoff
Staff Reporter

Are you feeling the pressure yet? That is, the pressure to make money and to find a good job that pays well right out of college and to know what you want to do with your life?
Despite that looming mountain of stress, it is beneficial to take a step back. There is no rush to get stuck in one career for the rest of our lives yet. While we are young, still forming our identities and are relatively free of the adult responsibilities that make travel difficult, it is healthy to get out and experience the world.
“But traveling costs money!” I hear you complain. This may be true, but there are ways around that. Through organizations like Americorp, the Peace Corp and religiously affiliated options, you can travel and help people. Through opportunities like World Nomads, you can try to get paid to travel. Various other internships, jobs, travel and work visas are out there waiting for you to try something new.
There is a book (and a website, but buy the book!) by Colleen Kinder called, “Delaying the Real World: A Twentysomething’s Guide to Seeking Adventure.” If you are serious about wanting some world experience, this is an excellent resource with which to grace your bookshelf. It is packed with relevant advice on “Endless ways to live, work, and volunteer overseas” and “Every Awesome Volunteer Opportunity Under the Sun,” as some of the subsections boast.
I am here to give you the age-old advice: to not be afraid to follow your dreams. If you are persistent, you can make them happen. If you are lucky, your one year off from work post-graduation can turn into something lucrative you can keep doing for longer than a year. And even if it doesn’t, self-enrichment from the great experiences you may have will stay with you for the rest of your life.

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Sasha Kasoff

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