Dating App Doesn’t Work For Everyone

Dating App Doesn’t Work For Everyone

Tinder Tinder has gained popularity as a dating app for smartphones.

                                                                                                                                                              Tinder
Tinder has gained popularity as a dating app for smartphones.

Everyone not in a relationship is looking for a leg up in the dating game. While couples are being all disgustingly cute and happy with someone they are perfect for, singles are always searching for that special someone to do this with, or do it with.

The latest method for singles to break into the dating game is a relatively new app called Tinder, available for all smartphones.

For those who have not downloaded the orange flame to their mobiles, Tinder is a dating app which has (no pun intended) spread like wildfire over the past year or so. Once downloaded and approved, Tinder syncs up with your Facebook page and creates a profile for you consisting of up to six pictures of you (of your choice) and a short bio complete with your name, age and anything else you want potential dates to know about you.

Once signed up, you get to customize a search range, featuring details such as what gender you are looking for, what mile (or kilometer) radius you want to search and what age range you prefer. It then finds every Tinder user who has similar interests (taken from Facebook) as you in your customized range.

You are presented with a lengthy (at first) list of people for you to choose from. If you wish to pass on someone you either click a red “x” or swipe to the left. If you like what you see, hit the green heart or swipe to the right. Do this until you run out of choices or get bored. If someone you liked also approved you, it means you are a match. Then, you talk to each other as if you were texting, flirt using cheesy pickup lines and then hook up or set up a date. It is fairly simple.

Or is it?

Yes, it is. The two main steps to being successful at Tinder are the two golden rules for dating throughout history: Be attractive and don’t be unattractive.

As in real life, Tinder approving is largely dependent on how attractive the opposite sex thinks you are. Only this time there is no chance for people to win over the hearts of others with silver tongues instead of looks because in order to talk to someone they need to swipe right when they see you.

Using Tinder is the technological equivalent of trying to pick up other singles in a crowded bar. You judge quickly based on looks and signals people give out, pop in and drop a line to the person of your interest, see if you get a nibble, and then go for it. You may feel incredibly judgmental afterwards, but it largely depends on your success.

You may swipe right for weeks without finding a match at a ratio of 200:1, but it will happen. However, this does not necessarily mean you are all set. For example, in the three months or so a certain editor who shall remain questionably ambiguous has used Tinder, he has swiped hundreds of girls right and been matched seven times. Two of the matches were bots created for advertising webcam sites. Three matches did not respond at all to first contact. One match responded with “Hi” and nothing further. The final match ended up being a decent conversation, but questions regarding if the topics of discussion were Mexican food items or double entendres sort of derailed talks. However, the editor’s lack of success may have something to do with the two golden rules. So, take this with a grain of salt.

So why, despite the prevalent lack of success, do people continue to go back to it? They do this because of the same reason people continue to hit up bars even after getting repeatedly shut down: potential. This app presents all users with the potential to meet Mr. or Ms. Right (or Mr. or Ms. Right Now). Eventually, it will work.

Just keep swiping right.

About Ruben Dominguez

Editor-in-chief at The Pacifican and Web Producer/Newsroom Assistant at FOX40 News, studies Communication at University of the Pacific, from Sacramento, California

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Ruben Dominguez

Editor-in-Chief at The Pacifican
Editor-in-chief at The Pacifican and Web Producer/Newsroom Assistant at FOX40 News, studies Communication at University of the Pacific, from Sacramento, California

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